A lender may charge a finance charge for each deferred deposit loan or payday loan that may not exceed 20 percent of the first $300 loaned plus seven and one-half percent of any amount loaned in excess of $300. Such charge shall be deemed fully earned as of the date of the transaction. The lender may also charge an interest rate of 45 percent per annum for each deferred deposit loan or payday loan. If the loan is prepaid prior to the maturity of the loan term, the lender shall refund to the consumer a prorated portion of the annual percentage rate based upon the ratio of time left before maturity to the loan term. In addition, the lender may charge a monthly maintenance fee for each outstanding deferred deposit loan, not to exceed $7.50 per $100 loaned, up to $30 per month. The monthly maintenance fee may be charged for each month the loan is outstanding 30 days after the date of the original loan transaction. The lender shall charge only those charges authorized in this article in connection with a deferred deposit loan. Upon renewal of a deferred deposit loan, the lender may assess an additional finance charge not to exceed an annual percentage rate of 45 percent. 

The Center for Responsible Lending found that almost half of payday loan borrowers will default on their loan within the first two years.[58] Taking out payday loans increases the difficulty of paying the mortgage, rent, and utility bills. The possibility of increased economic difficulties leads to homelessness and delays in medical and dental care and the ability to purchase drugs. For military men, using payday loans lowers overall performance and shortens service periods. To limit the issuance of military payday loans, the 2007 Military Lending Act established an interest rate ceiling of 36% on military payday loans.[59] A 2013 article by Dobbie and Skiba found that more than 19% of initial loans in their study ended in default. Based on this, Dobbie and Skiba claim that the payday loan market is high risk.[60]
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