To prevent usury (unreasonable and excessive rates of interest), some jurisdictions limit the annual percentage rate (APR) that any lender, including payday lenders, can charge. Some jurisdictions outlaw payday lending entirely, and some have very few restrictions on payday lenders. In the United States, the rates of these loans used to be restricted in most states by the Uniform Small Loan Laws (USLL),[4][5] with 36–40% APR generally the norm.
Consumer advocates and other experts[who?] argue, however, that payday loans appear to exist in a classic market failure. In a perfect market of competing sellers and buyers seeking to trade in a rational manner, pricing fluctuates based on the capacity of the market. Payday lenders have no incentive to price their loans competitively since loans are not capable of being patented. Thus, if a lender chooses to innovate and reduce cost to borrowers in order to secure a larger share of the market the competing lenders will instantly do the same, negating the effect. For this reason, among others, all lenders in the payday marketplace charge at or very near the maximum fees and rates allowed by local law.[25]
The process to obtain a payday loan is very easy, and it all starts with filling out our online request form on the left side of this page. Within minutes of submitting it, a representative from your nearest store location will call you back to confirm your information, answer your questions and make sure you have the simple required items for your payday loan.
Arizona usury law prohibits lending institutions to charge greater than 36% annual interest on a loan.[26] On July 1, 2010, a law exempting payday loan companies from the 36% cap expired.[30] State Attorney General Terry Goddard initiated Operation Sunset, which aggressively pursues lenders who violate the lending cap. The expiration of the law caused many payday loan companies to shut down their Arizona operations, notably Advance America.[31]
Regulations for payday loans vary greatly from state to state. Some states, like Oregon, place practically no restrictions on payday loans, while other states ban them entirely. The regulations of your state have a huge effect on what lenders can charge. As a borrower, it’s important for you to be aware of these regulations and to make sure your loan has the right terms and fees dictated by law.

The payday loan industry takes advantage of the fact that most borrowers do not know how to calculate their loan's APR and do not realize that they are being changed rates up to 390% interest annually.[61] Critics of payday lending cite the possibility that transactions with in the payday market may reflect a market failure that is due to asymmetric information or the borrowers' cognitive biases or limitations.[62]
Have unexpected bills or car repairs caught you off guard? Has your budget been stretched too tight this month? If your current finances won’t see you through to your next payday, a short-term loan could help bridge the gap. You can conveniently apply for these loans online to receive your funds either by check, direct deposit or cash pickup in a store. The application process typically takes minutes, and you can see your funds quickly if you’re approved — in as little as 15 minutes with some lenders.
If you’re falling short on your bills and just trying to make it paycheck to paycheck, a payday loan may be exactly what you’re looking for. A payday loan is a small principal, short-term loan that typically is paid back around the time of your next pay day. With Speedy Cash, we make receiving money when you need it a breeze with our fast application process, quick lending decision, and the opportunity to get your cash upon approval. Whether you apply online, in-store, or over the phone, we promise you’ll receive the same easy, fast and friendly service. Hit apply now to stay on top of your monthly expenses.
To prevent usury (unreasonable and excessive rates of interest), some jurisdictions limit the annual percentage rate (APR) that any lender, including payday lenders, can charge. Some jurisdictions outlaw payday lending entirely, and some have very few restrictions on payday lenders. In the United States, the rates of these loans used to be restricted in most states by the Uniform Small Loan Laws (USLL),[4][5] with 36–40% APR generally the norm.
One of the most appealing aspects of payday loans is that they do not perform credit checks. The loans are meant to be short-term, so the loan terms often dictate that you repay with your next paycheck. You can ask for an extension, but additional fees will be added. This will increase the amount that you owe the lender and if you are still unable to pay your loan off upon your next due date then the cycle goes on.
Payday loans have a bad reputation, and in fact many people refer to these loans as “predatory lending.” Twelve states have even banned payday loans altogether. Caution should be taken when considering obtaining these types of loans, which often “rollover” or are extended when they can’t be repaid in time and result in additional extension fees and an overall larger repayment amount. Because of the risk, payday loans should only be used in emergency situations when you know you can pay the loan back in full on time. If you do not borrow, you could end up in more debt.
"... payday lending services extend small amounts of uncollateralized credit to high-risk borrowers, and provide loans to poor households when other financial institutions will not. Throughout the past decade, this "democratization of credit" has made small loans available to mass sectors of the population, and particularly the poor, that would not have had access to credit of any kind in the past."[40]
Any installment payday loan must be fully amortizing, with a finance charge calculated on the principal balances scheduled to be outstanding and be repayable in substantially equal and consecutive installments, according to a payment schedule agreed by the parties with not less than 13 days and not more than one month between payments; except that the first installment period may be longer than the remaining installment periods by not more than 15 days, and the first installment payment may be larger than the remaining installment payments by the amount of finance charges applicable to the extra days.
Contact your local consumer credit counseling service if you need help working out a debt repayment plan with creditors or developing a budget. Non-profit groups in every state offer credit guidance to consumers for no or low cost. You may want to check with your employer, credit union, or housing authority for no- or low-cost credit counseling programs, too. 

Here’s how they work: A borrower writes a personal check payable to the lender for the amount the person wants to borrow, plus the fee they must pay for borrowing. The company gives the borrower the amount of the check less the fee, and agrees to hold the check until the loan is due, usually the borrower’s next payday. Or, with the borrower’s permission, the company deposits the amount borrowed — less the fee — into the borrower’s checking account electronically. The loan amount is due to be debited the next payday. The fees on these loans can be a percentage of the face value of the check — or they can be based on increments of money borrowed: say, a fee for every $50 or $100 borrowed. The borrower is charged new fees each time the same loan is extended or “rolled over.”
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