A licensee may charge the customer a service fee for each deferred presentment service transaction. A service fee is earned by the licensee on the date of the transaction and is not interest. A licensee may charge both of the following as part of the service fee, as applicable: (a) An amount that does not exceed the aggregate of the following, as applicable: (i) 15 percent of the first $100 of the deferred presentment service transaction. (ii) 14 percent of the second $100 of the deferred presentment service transaction. (iii) 13 percent of the third $100 of the deferred presentment service transaction. (iv) 12 percent of the fourth $100 of the deferred presentment service transaction. (v) 11 percent of the fifth $100 of the deferred presentment service transaction. (vi) 11 percent of the sixth $100 of the deferred presentment service transaction. (b) The amount of any database verification fee allowed under §34(5). 
No licensee shall: (1) Charge check-cashing fees in excess of three percent of the face amount of the check, or $5, whichever is greater, if the check is the payment of any kind of state public assistance or federal social security benefit; (2) Charge check-cashing fees for personal checks in excess of 10 percent of the face amount of the personal check or $5, whichever is greater; or (3) Charge check-cashing fees in excess of five percent of the face amount of the check or $5, whichever is greater, for all other checks. (4) Charge deferred deposit transaction fees in excess of 10 percent of the amount of funds advanced.
The Center for Responsible Lending found that almost half of payday loan borrowers will default on their loan within the first two years.[58] Taking out payday loans increases the difficulty of paying the mortgage, rent, and utility bills. The possibility of increased economic difficulties leads to homelessness and delays in medical and dental care and the ability to purchase drugs. For military men, using payday loans lowers overall performance and shortens service periods. To limit the issuance of military payday loans, the 2007 Military Lending Act established an interest rate ceiling of 36% on military payday loans.[59] A 2013 article by Dobbie and Skiba found that more than 19% of initial loans in their study ended in default. Based on this, Dobbie and Skiba claim that the payday loan market is high risk.[60]
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