A licensee may charge and collect interest in respect of a loan at such daily, weekly, monthly, annual or other periodic percentage rate or rates as the agreement governing the loan provides or as established in the manner provided in such agreement and may calculate such interest by way of simple interest or such other method as the agreement governing the loan provides. If the interest is precomputed it may be calculated on the assumption that all scheduled payments will be made when due. For purposes hereof, a year may but need not be a calendar year and may be such period of from 360 to 366 days, including or disregarding leap year, as the licensee may determine.

The Center for Responsible Lending, an organization that calls for more safeguards for consumers, found in 2015 that payday loan storefronts in Ohio advertised rates of more than 600 percent annual percentage rate. Diane Standaert, director of state policy, said that since that time some storefronts now reflect rates between 300 and 400 percent for some loans. 

A licensee that has obtained the required small loan endorsement may charge interest or fees for small loans not to exceed in the aggregate 15 percent of the first $500 of principal. If the principal exceeds $500, a licensee may charge interest or fees not to exceed in the aggregate 10 percent of that portion of the principal in excess of $500. If a licensee makes more than one loan to a single borrower, and the aggregated principal of all loans made to that borrower exceeds $500 at any one time, the licensee may charge interest or fees not to exceed in the aggregate 10 percent on that portion of the aggregated principal of all loans at any one time that is in excess of $500. 

The Center for Responsible Lending found that almost half of payday loan borrowers will default on their loan within the first two years.[58] Taking out payday loans increases the difficulty of paying the mortgage, rent, and utility bills. The possibility of increased economic difficulties leads to homelessness and delays in medical and dental care and the ability to purchase drugs. For military men, using payday loans lowers overall performance and shortens service periods. To limit the issuance of military payday loans, the 2007 Military Lending Act established an interest rate ceiling of 36% on military payday loans.[59] A 2013 article by Dobbie and Skiba found that more than 19% of initial loans in their study ended in default. Based on this, Dobbie and Skiba claim that the payday loan market is high risk.[60]
×