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Check Into Cash advances range anywhere from $50 to $1,000 depending on your state of residence. The qualifications for our loans are typically less stringent than for conventional loans. In exchange for the cash you need, Check Into Cash charges a small fee. This fee along with the original amount borrowed is typically due on your next day of pay. 

According to a study by The Pew Charitable Trusts, "Most payday loan borrowers [in the United States] are white, female, and are 25 to 44 years old. However, after controlling for other characteristics, there are five groups that have higher odds of having used a payday loan: those without a four-year college degree; home renters; African Americans; those earning below $40,000 annually; and those who are separated or divorced." Most borrowers use payday loans to cover ordinary living expenses over the course of months, not unexpected emergencies over the course of weeks. The average borrower is indebted about five months of the year.[14]
A cash advance loan is a small, short-term, high-interest loan that is offered in anticipation of the receipt of a future lump sum of cash or payment. Although a cash advance may be made in anticipation of future legal winnings, pensions, inheritances, insurance awards, alimony or real estate proceeds, the most common cash advance loans are Payday Loans and Tax Refund Anticipation Loans.
Under Ohio law, a Credit Service Organization is an organization that, among other things, helps consumers find loans. There is no cap on the fee that the Credit Service Organization may charge for its services. In the standard payday lending contract, you agree that you are hiring a Credit Service Organization to "find" the loan for you, and that the payday lender is "accepting" your payment to the Credit Service Organization.
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By examining payday loan prices in each state from the four largest lenders, Pew found that over five months a $300 payday loan would cost an Ohio borrower $680 in interest and fees, which equals an average annual percentage rate of 591 percent (which is close to the 594 percent figure cited by Cordray.) No other state had a higher rate, according to the Pew analysis. The interest and fees amount in Ohio was slightly exceeded by Texas, but Texas has more protections for consumers, including a 180-day loan limit that Ohio doesn’t have.
Critics of the CFPB rule, such as House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-Tex.), argue that federal regulation of these loans infringes on state sovereignty. But the current system of state-level regulation, without any federal floor, imposes its  burdens on states that seek to protect their residents from payday loans. Lenders often operate across state lines, lending from states where payday loans are permitted to borrowers in states where such loans are illegal. This makes it incredibly difficult for these “restrictive” states to protect their residents from being saddled with unaffordable debts.

Arizona usury law prohibits lending institutions to charge greater than 36% annual interest on a loan.[26] On July 1, 2010, a law exempting payday loan companies from the 36% cap expired.[30] State Attorney General Terry Goddard initiated Operation Sunset, which aggressively pursues lenders who violate the lending cap. The expiration of the law caused many payday loan companies to shut down their Arizona operations, notably Advance America.[31]
Small loans secured by access to the borrower’s bank account are authorized in three states at lower than typical rates.  Maine caps interest at 30 percent but permits tiered fees that result in up to 261 percent annual rates for a two-week $250 loan.  Oregon permits a one-month minimum term payday loan at 36 percent interest lus a $10 per $100 borrowed initial loan fees.  As a result, a $250 one-month loan costs 154 percent annual interest for the initial loan, and 36 percent for any subsequent loans.  Colorado amended its payday loan law in 2010 to set a minimum six-month term for loans based on checks held by the lender.  A Colorado payday loan may include charges of 45 percent per annum interest, a monthly maintenance fee of 7.5 percent per month after the first month, and a tiered system of finance charges, with 20 percent for the first $300 borrower and an additional 7.5 percent for amounts from $301 to $500.  Loans can be prepaid at any time with a rebate of unearned fees, repaid in installments, or repaid in one lump sum.
When interest rates on payday loans were capped to 150% in Oregon, causing a mass exit from the industry and preventing borrowers from taking out payday loans, there was a negative effect with bank overdrafts, late bills, and employment. The effect is in the opposite direction for military personnel. Job performance and military readiness declines with increasing access to payday loans.[41]
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